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fish

1-15 | 16-30 | 31-36
 Apr 3, 2012; 01:15PM - Hawaiin jug trick
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Seamus
 Author E-mail:  seamusday@gmail.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: I recently learned this from an old Hawaiian fishing
book a friend loaned to me.
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<>When fishing for dolphin take a gallon jug attached to 20 feet of aid or dacron with a 2 ounce egg sinker sliding on it, connect to a swivel and then 6-10 feet of mono or fluro and a 6/0 circle hook.
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<>When you start hooking dolphin in the spread, throw the jug overboard baited with a chunk of fish, squid or small live-bait, being careful not to tangle your trolling lines. As you play out the already hooked fish, inevitably another dolphin takes the jug bait.
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<>This prevents you from losing the shoal whilst fighting the trolled fish and you also get several followers to cast to around the milk jug that you can go back to once you landed the first fish.
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<>Use a gaff to retrieve the jug/fish through the jug handle.
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<>Have tried it twice now and it worked like a charm both times, resulting in much more sport and fish on the grill.. Not sure if there are 'rules or regulations' against such things in the USA though..
 Jun 5, 2009; 09:59AM - the wiggley wiggle
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  ed moses
 Author E-mail:  virginia_rooster@yahoo.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: needed 7'' worm with tail any color
Tip&Trick Description 2: cast lure let it sink all the way to the bottom retrieve with stop and go process with quick short jerks in between reeling make sure to pause often
Tip&Trick Description 3: the fish will inhale the bait on the pause this method is guaranteed to catch bass also works well on other fresh water fish good luck out there
 Apr 5, 2009; 12:57PM - great trout technique
 Category:  [other]
 Author Name:  eric cvetkovich
 Author E-mail:  ericcvet@aol.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: when fishing for trout they are attracted to ligh and dark colors so use 2 different grub colors like black and green at a the same time
 Mar 5, 2009; 05:22PM - Meat Stock Cube Chemical Lure
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Mike Cobb
 Author E-mail:  michaelcobb103@btinternet.com
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 1: MEAT STOCK CUBE CHEMICAL LURE
This started off by being an applied science project in school linked to fishing for predatory species. I am happy for anyone to try it out. It takes some preparation but is worth the experiment. You can use it for river, lake or sea fishing from a bank, beach, pier or boat. Use the strongest line you have for dragging. Have a camera to get evidence of your catch.

First get your meat stock cubes – the red varieties are the best imitation of the fluids that leak from wounded prey. They are much cheaper if bought in the large boxes and cost even less if you can get them put on someone else’s shopping list.

You also need a pair of tights or stockings so ask nicely – particularly if someone is wearing them at the time!

Cut the tights/stockings up into 10cm (4in) squares and put them onto a flat surface.

Take the foil wrapping off of each stock cube being careful not to crumble it and place one centrally onto each square of the tights/stockings.

Tie the four corners of the material together into a firm knot – a test of your dexterity – you may need to use bigger squares at first and trim them up afterwards.

Then tie a length of line inside the knot of each lure bag leaving plenty of spare to attach to the eye on your lure. Store your bags in a waterproof and crushproof container.

When you are ready to fish attach a bag to the eye of your lure making sure that you tie the knot so that a used bag can be easily removed from the eye but cannot slip off during movement underwater. A pair of fine scissors will useful to do the cutting during bag changing. Dispose of used bags and line responsibly please – not into the water or onto the site.

Keep safe – wear a lifejacket if you are fishing on or by deep water. Keep yourself warm and waterproof. Do not fish on your own – it is safer with others. Let someone know where you are going and have a means of contacting him or her.
 Feb 15, 2009; 04:24PM - Make 'Em Last : Save A Grub
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Nathan
 Author E-mail:  none
Tip&Trick Description 1: Make your grubs, curly tails, dingers, etc last by sliding the grub past the eye of the hook and then stick a toothpick/shaved wood into the eye and cut the ends. This prevents throwing the grub off even after a few hits. Also play with the cutting to change a lure's action.
 Apr 16, 2006; 08:39PM - Flashing stick baits for pike.
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Kasow
 Author E-mail:  dmkadow@earthlink.net
Tip&Trick Description 1: When fishing for aggressive or active pike try using shallow running stick bait and retrieve the lure until it is about 10-15 feet away from the boat/pier. Then give it a jerk. The lure will create a bright flash that triggers the pike to bite. This technique works best in clear to mildly clear or stained water. You can try this for bass too.
 Nov 22, 2005; 02:53PM - The Bubbles
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  joe webb
 Author E-mail:  phatfarm44001@yahoo.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: when the water is cold and the bass are slow. tie on a tube and break off some peices of alkaselesrs and put them into the bait. and cast and hang on.
 Aug 23, 2005; 08:14PM - Dead Sticking Bass
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Delaware Tackle
 Author E-mail:  swvbbass@comcast.net
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 1: When the weather is nasty, be it in the early spring or late fall, many anglers miss out on some of the best bass fishing of the year. When their boats are in the garage, and their gear is stored away, other anglers in the know, cash in on some of the best fishing of the year using some special techniques. One of the most effective ways to catch big bass in colder water, is a technique known as 'Dead-Sticking.' The anglers who can brave the elements and employ these techniques, catch some of the largest bass of the year.

'Dead-Sticking Technique'

The name of the technique tells it all. The technique actually involves more patience than action. Some of the best ways to present a bait using a Dead-Sticking technique are Drop-Shotting, using a suspending jerkbait, and fluttering soft plastics to the bottom. These are great ways to tempt early season and late season bass. You won't catch a ton of bass in really cold water, but you can have a memorable day, and catch some of the larger bass of the year. When the water temperature is in the low to mid forties, shad and herring either die off in the winter, or they are so lethargic, that they are a good target for feeding bass. A lure that suspends at the level of the bass, or just falls slowly to the bottom, or in the case of the drop-shot, just sits still in the middle of the water column, offers a tempting imitation of a dying shad.

'Jerkbaits'

There are many good Jerkbaits on the market today, but for dead-sticking techniques I like certain baits more than others. Smithwick Rogues, Lucky Craft Pointers, and Rapala Husky Jerks, and Strike Pro USA are among my favorites.

They are excellant baits for dead-sticking because they suspend. You can throw them out, reel them down, and play the waiting game. I have done this, and many times, while getting a drink, or grabbing something to eat, the bass have hit the bait. Sometimes it takes as long as a minute, or even two, before a bass will move up to a suspending bait and decide to hit it. I throw the baits way past the target, and jerk it down to where I think the bass are. In some bigger lakes and reservoirs I like to fish any standing timber they have available. I jerk the bait down, and then stop it right by a tree. I then let it sit as long as a minute before moving it again.

Many times the bass will hit while it is sitting still, or when I first start to move it again. This happened to me quite a few times in Greenwood Lake and in Union Lake, in New Jersey. It is an excellent way to catch cold water bass in these and other lakes. I had great success with this method on Table Rock Lake, and Bull Shoals in Missouri, working the standing timber.

It doesn't really matter if it's a tree, or rocks, or next to a dock. The trick is to let the bait sit there for as long as it takes, without moving it all. A lot of anglers are tempted to impart some action to the bait, but this is a mistake. This is the time to wait as long as you can stand it. Nerves of steel are required for this type of fishing.

Another good location to use this technique is over old roadbeds, like in Spruce Run reservoir in New Jersey. I also like to use them along bluff walls, and across long tapering points. When the water starts to warm in the spring, or after a warm spell in the winter, bass will move up from the deeper water and suspend over or near these areas. These are ideal baits to use to entice them into striking. I like to find a long flat point, near a creek channel, where the deep water isn't far from the shallow water. This is where the bass will be, due to the fact that don't have to move very far, which is important this time of year, but especially true in the winter.

When bass are suspending, if you throw a carolina-rigged bait, you are actually fishing under the bass, if you use a crankbait, you're usually fishing too fast. This is why suspending jerkbaits are ideal, because they get right down into the suspended bass and stay in one place. This is even more important in the winter, than the early spring. I make sure I fan cast the entire structure from many different angles. Many times the bass don't hit the bait until it is presented at just the right angle, and you won't know what that is until you make enough casts to start catching fish.

The most strikes occur in about eight to ten feet of water, and suspending baits that go down to about eight feet are the best. You need at least two feet of visibility for dead-sticking baits, and more is preferable. It is very important for them to be able to see it, as you are not moving the bait, and it doesn't make much noise. My best days deadsticking have been on lakes with a good degree of visibility.

'Dead-Sticking Soft Plastics'

Most bass fisherman use Zoom Flukes, Bass Assassins, and other soft plastics, with a twitch, twitch, reel twitch action, like in the warmer months, but using these baits with a dead-sticking technique in the colder water, works wonders. Bass won't come up and hit these baits on or near the surface when it's cold, but they do hit it when it falls slowly to the bottom. It takes so much patience to work these baits right in cold water that most anglers don't have the patience it takes to work them properly. I use the bait on a unweighted 4/0 or 5/0 WG hook, and let it fall slowly to the bottom. The bait only sinks about one foot every three to four seconds, and this is perfect to imitate a dying shad. I have had the best luck with this in the winter, but in the very early spring, it can be effective also. I just cast it out next to the structure, whether it's a dock, or brushpile, or just over some type of structure that the bass are suspending on. I might twitch it a couple of times as it falls, but not too much, just enough to convince a bass that it is crippled or dying. It is a great bait for areas that have a lot of dying shad in the winter.

One of the baits that I have had the most success with last year using these dead-sticking methods, is the Yamamoto 'Senko.' This bait is perfect to use dead-sticking. Although it is nothing more than a thin, straight piece of plastic when it is out of the water, it literally comes alive with just the right action to entice bass in colder water. The new 'Netbaits' have also worked very well this year, as have the 'Bearpaws' 'Lazy Sticks'. It is perfect for letting sink slowly to the bottom, or for drop-shotting. Because of the salt content in these baits, it sinks a little faster than an unsalted lure. These baits are perfect for a lot of different situations, as long as you have to patience to let them sink. You really don't have to do anything to these lures, except let them sink slowly on a slack line. I rig them on a 2/0 or 3/0 Daiichi or X-Point hooks, on fourteen pound test Spiderline Super Mono, or P-Line.The trick is to pay very close attention to the line, sometimes you might feel a bite, but generally you will not. I just move the rod tip a little bit to see if I can feel the weight of the bass. If I can't, I just let it fall slowly to the bottom again. The action really comes when the bait is falling, so you have to lift the rod slowly, and let it fall back again as you work it across the bottom. There is even a new larger Senko for this year that I am looking forward to using. Even the new Cut-Tail worm may work well in these cold water situations, and I am looking forward to trying them out this year.

'Drop-Shotting'

The best technique to come along for cold water or suspending bass is the Drop-Shot technique. Drop-Shotting can tempt bass into striking in the cold water at all times of the year. In the late winter, or very early spring, I just cast it out, let it hit the bottom, and tighten my line up. I use very little action at all. I don't really shake my rod tip or anything, I just let it sit.

The less action the better! I do fish them around some structure also, and generally when I do this I work the bait with a little more action up to the cover, and then just let it sit when I get next to it. It is a very effective method in the winter or spring. I generally use a three to four inch bait on drop-shot rigs, but other baits have worked at different times. The hardest part of fishing in the winter or very early spring isn't the fishing itself, but motivating yourself to get out there and go when the weather is less than desirable.

This is where the patience comes in, as it is very hard to sit still for long periods of time, and work the bait as slowly as is necessary to produce the strikes. Dead-Sticking really works if you remember exactly what it means. I like to use a high modulus graphite rod for the Dead-Sticking techniques, in a 6 1/2 to 7 foot length, with twelve to fourteen pound test line. I use spinning gear on little finesse baits, or a light line baitcaster. I use a baitcast rod, and up to fourteen to seventeen pound test line, in the deeper water, and for larger baits. Try these techniques this year, and your recreational and tournament fishing will improve greatly.

Delaware Tackle www.delawaretackle.com


Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 2: Times when 'Stealth' Crankbaits outperform their noisy cousins!!!!

Seen any new crankbaits that don't feature rattle chambers? They're fast becoming a rarity. Crankbait guru David Fritts believes noisy crankbaits have become so ubiquitous that they sometimes turn off more bass than they actually attract.

Whenever Fritts is on a crank-and-destroy mission, he has rods rigged with noisy and quit crankbaits. Conditions often dictate which type will be more productive, but bass don't always respond in a predictable fashion. He generally fishes noisy crankbaits about two months a year.

That's in February or March, depending on what part of the country I'm fishing,' offered Fritts. 'And again in October or November. Bass are chasing and feeding then, and you want to let them know the bait is there.'

Fritts also catches bass on rattling crankbaits in the summertime when they feed early and late in the day. Muddy water is another situation in which clamorous crankbaits come through for Fritts. The commotion helps bass locate the bait when they can't see it, he explained.

But the well-known North Carolina pro runs silent and runs deep when he encounters tough fishing conditions, which typically include slick water and bright sunlit days that follow cold fronts. In both situations, a quiet crankbait that swims with a tight wiggle is more likely to coax strikes, because it closely mimics a swimming baitfish.

Although Fritts usually cranks with a medium-speed retrieve, he throws in a few 'change-ups' when he's working quiet crankbaits, one of the things that has always separated Fritts from mere mortal anglers.

'When fishing is really tough, it takes repeated casts to trigger a strike,' said Fritts. 'A lot of times the casting angle comes into play. You have to catch them off-guard. It gets a little tricky.'

It also may be that a silent crankbait sneaks closer to bass before they become aware of its presence. Whereas a bass may sense a noisy crankbait at some distance and have plenty of time to reject it, a silent crankbait suddenly appears in the fish's face and sparks a reflex response. When casting to a group of bass, the first strike often rouses the rest of the school.

'If you can get one of two bass in a school to bite, you can get the rest of them feeding,' added Fritts. 'You can't beat a subtle crankbait for getting things started.'

More tips and articles at www.skguideservice.com




Brett Ware of Ambush Lures with a 8.5 lb Bass and the new Ambush Pro Series cranks and Luresaver Technology

New 'Ambush Pro Series' Cranks with Luresaver Technology

Your chunking your tackle along the bank hoping to get some action on some big bass and get a productive pattern defined. The next thing you know is …..BAM! BAM! BAM! …and now your on the pattern but you’re fish’n thick structure so you look in your tackle box to make sure you have another one in case you loose this one. It turns out that the only one you have of the 'hot’ color is the one on your line. Oh No!!! If I loose it, I’m screwed!

Has that ever happened to you in a tournament situation or when you are out in the middle of BFE fishing your secret fish’n hole. Well it sure happened to me on my recent trip to lake El Salto in Mexico. In case you’re not familiar with lake El Salto, it is about a 2 hour drive northeast of Mazatlan, Mexico, to the Angler’s Inn resort where we stayed. The nearest tackle shop that I could buy another one of the lures was probably around 3000 miles away. Not a good situation to be in but I’ve found myself more and more in this situation with the pressure that many of the fisheries are receiving.

We were down at lake El Salto to field test some new product introductions for the 2004 fishing season. Throughout the days we were field-testing various color patterns of our new 'Ambush Pro Series' cranks that Tim Hughes painted up for us. As usual, the colors that were the hottest and I mean 'HOT', we only had one of each color. With the type structure that the big hogs were hanging in, it was a necessary evil to fish the structure if we wanted to get to those 'Grande' bass. Then I remembered about some titanium snap rings called Luresavers that I was introduced to last summer by one of the top pros that was fishing the Bassmaster Classic. These new Luresavers allow your lure to release from structure when your lure is hung up and I just happened to have a few of them that I had purchased in my tackle box . I’m proud to say that we put the Luresavers on all the hot colors and never lost one crankbait the rest of the trip. The Luresavers were truly amazing and enabled us to land over 100 bass the last day between 3 and 8.5 lbs. Pictured above is the 8.5 lb bass that topped our list and the smile says it all.





In fact we liked the Luresavers so much that we decided to put them on all the new 'Ambush Pro Series' crankbaits that we are introducing for 2004. At Ambush, our goal is to put out the highest quality fishing lures on the market and no top-end crankbait would be the same without the Luresavers on them. If you are heading down to El Salto, I’d recommend you take the 'Orange Craw', 'Green Craw', and 'Pearl Black Back' in the new Tim Hughes looks. The colors truly will produce what you’re after and enable you to fish the structure where the big bass are hanging out. Pictured above is the 8.5 lb bass that topped my list and the smile says it all.



Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 3: Winning Tournament Tactics
By Steve and Kurt vonBrandt
Mar 5, 2005, 23:40



There are certain tactics that give a tournament fisherman an edge over the other competitors, and produce a win. Sometimes just doing a little extra homework and preparation is all it takes. Planning, practice, and confidence are the keys factors that helped us win local, state, club, and regional tournaments consistently while working our way up the ranks of competitive bass fishing. Here are some of the most important things to do to prepare yourself mentally and physically for the challenge.
MENTAL AND PHYSICAL PREPARATION

Before you even can consider embarking on a tournament trail, or even local, and club events, you must be in good physical condition. This involves being able to lift, bend, twist, and move in a variety of positions, without getting injured. Many people think that fishing is a leisurely sport, but in order to be in top shape for winning tournaments, you must prepare ahead of time. We not only eat and sleep properly, but do regular physical workouts, to get in good shape to lift equipment, jump from the front and back of boats, maintain good balance, have quick reflexes, and be able to go long periods of time, without wasting time eating and drinking. Being able to jump down to your knees quickly, and maneuvering many directions efficiently can mean the difference in winning or losing. One lost fish can mean the difference in first place and last place many times. Not only do we work out physically to prepare, but we practice our techniques in the off season as well. In the winter, and all times of the year in between tournaments, we practice our flipping, pitching, and casting techniques. In the colder months we set up boxes, simulate docks to practice pitching and flipping, and cast to targets in the yard. Knowing your equipment like the back of your hand, and being able to quickly execute a maneuver is critical in a tournament. Practicing all techniques constantly is vital in giving you the confidence that you need to win when you get to the tournament. Being able to control your emotions, and relax in the prior days and nights can give you an edge over the more inexperienced anglers. Most tournament pros even at intermediate levels are at the top of their game, and take it very seriously, so a slight edge can mean a great deal. The people who can maintain their composure and confidence, and can stick to their game plans under pressure, are the ones that consistently place in the rankings.

STUDYING THE COMPETITION SITE

Before we even start to prefish the lakes or rivers, we obtain all the information we can in the way of lake maps, topographical maps, baitfish, and lake conditions from a variety of sources. Talking to anglers at the lake and local tackle shops can sometimes reveal some interesting information. By no means, do what they say dictate what our plans will be, but it is another tool to use in planning a strategy for the lake. Knowing the lake age, composition of the bottom, structure, both natural and manmade, along with water quality, fertility, and oxygen levels, all come into play when deciding how to start pre-fishing the lake. Contacting local guides, and having some experience on the body of water all help, although sometimes this isn't always possible.

When we start to prefish the lake before a tournament, we break the lake down into sections. We eliminate the unproductive water for that time of year, and then section it off on maps. We pick the most likely locations where the fish should be holding for the water temperature and lake conditions, and then make a complete run around the lake to view it physically before fishing.

We start by looking for sandbars, points, humps, structure, laydowns, grass beds, etc., all the time watching the shoreline in the area for contours to indicate dropoffs and other structure. After surveying the lake, we then section off several of the best possible locations, and start fishing there. First starting with a search bait, such as a spinnerbait, buzzbait, and a crankbait for active fish. We mark the locations of where the active fish are on the GPS, and move on to the next spot. We never stick more than two fish in an area. Sometimes we fish the baits without any hooks in them, and when they hit you just pull it away from them. Try to find three good sections of the lake with decent fish first, before exploring further for the kicker fish. You can go back to these areas later the next day, and slow down to find the fish that you need to win. Sometimes early in the year bass will stage on a single piece of cover as small as a stick or blade of grass. It doesn't even have to be real structure sometimes, they just hold next to it. Most of the time, the larger bass, five pounds and up, are alone. They occupy the structure in the area by themselves, rarely schooling with fish of the same size.

UNCONVENTIONAL BAITS

Most pros won't reveal what they really catch the larger fish on. Most of the fish in lakes that are highly pressured by recreational and tournament anglers for years and years, become conditioned to certain baits. There are always fish that can be caught on conventional baits such as spinnerbaits, worms, and jerkbaits, but these generally are the fish that don't win tournaments. You can come in with a decent bag of five fish weighing ten to thirteen pounds, but it generally doesn't get you a check except in some local and club tournaments. The larger fish, the fourm five, and six pound bass, and up, are usually caught on baits such as frogs, prop baits, walking baits, and other types of new freak baits. Jigs will always take some of the better fish, but will not always win. Old style topwaters, such as a Devils Horse, Dying flutters, Nip-A-Dee-Dee's, and others, take many large bass. Let me emphasize though, that i like to get a limit in the boat first before pursuing that big 'kicker' fish!

Creek Chubs, Zara Spooks, Jitterbugs, and others, take more quality fish than you can imagine, due to the fact that they are fooled by the baits they just don't see. Of course, there are specific ways to work these baits, that will produce the better fish, even if you are using the same baits as another angler, and that is the trick.

When casting to structure with a topwater bait like this, dead sticking, and casting directly to the target, and not past it, can be critical. Patience and steady nerves are required to do this properly. Deadsticking a bait is an extremely effective way to win a tournament on highly pressured waters such as Table Rock Lake. In colder water, this is extremely important also. You should let a Senko or other bait such as a fluke or 'Sizmic Flugo' fall weightless for a long time by the structure, without giving it any movement at all. Suspending jerk baits worked in this manner also produce the bigger bass in pressured waters. Don't give the bait to much action, and let it sit for a long time in between movements. This is the key.

TIME MANAGEMENT

You must learn how to manage your time properly also, as you have to be thorough with the baits, but know when to switch and when to move. Plan this out in advance and be able to adjust to the water conditions and mood of the fish that day, as things can change rapidly from one day to the next on a body of water, especially when a clod front moves through. Practice at all times of the year, when the weather is bad, and cold, odds are, that many tournament days will be in the rain and wind. You need to know how to catch these fish under adverse conditions, not just fair weather. Plan your trips when the weather is poor. It's the only way the learn what to do. You must get practice in real tournament conditions. Make sure you time your run to the spots, and spend your time wisely there. Make as many casts as you can until the very last minute, and then open it up and get back as quickly as you can. You need to practice driving your boat in bad weather, under rough conditions, at high speeds, if you really want to win.

PRACTICE LANDING BIG FISH

You should try to join a private lake and a club, or make trips to Mexico, Texas, Florida, and wherever else you can experience fighting and landing a lot of larger fish. Confidence is the key to success in this business. You must have the confidence in your ability to land big fish without getting overly excited. This is hard to do, so as much practice as you can get doing this before entering major tournaments is a definite plus! A big part of this game is mental. You must learn how to to maintain a high level of concentration also. Don't pay attention to other things other than your line, the lure, and the fish. Ignore other anglers and spectators that are close by. Keep your focus, and stick to your game plan. Don't try to show off. That comes later at the weigh in with a twenty pound bag! Maintain and use the best quality equipment that you can get. This plays a big part in confidence also. It doesn't always have to be the very highest quality equipment, but you must have confidence in it, and in your own ability to use it properly. Sometimes I go through thirty crankbaits and jerkbaits before I find the best ones. Don't neglect the basics either. Learn how to tie all the proper knots for the baits you are using, and use the highest quality hooks available. I can't stress this enough. Follow these guidelines, and get out and practice as much as you can, and your recreational fishing as well as tournament fishing will improve drastically.

More specialized techniques are available by joining our 'Premium' section at our site at www.skguideservice.com


 Nov 12, 2004; 09:52AM - ATTRACT FISH (ΜΕΛΑΝΟΥΡΙ-ΣΑΡΓΟ&
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  C.E.GIONIS
 Author E-mail:  GARDENDESIGNER6@HOTMAIL.COM
Tip&Trick Description 1: TO ATTRACT FISH WHILE YOU INTEND TO USE A WHIP WITH RIG FOR SPARIDAES FAMILY YOU CAN USE THE FOLLOWING:
PUT ABOYT 1 KGR (KILO) OF ANY FISH (FRESH OF NOT IT IS THA SAME)IN A BOX WITH HERMETIC LID. LEAVE IT FOR 1 WEEK TO HAVE THEM ROT. OPEN AND ADD SAND ABOUT DOUBLE THE VOLUME OF FISH USED.MIX VERY WELL AND USE A SPOON TO THROW IT SLOWLY SLOWLY EVERY 5 MINUTES IN THE WATERS
(LIITLE AND OFTEN)
START FISHING USING YR WHIP EQUIPPED WITH MOTHER LINE N18, 2 HOOK LINES N15-16 WITH LENGTHS 55-60 CM AND VERY SMALL LEAD AND FLOATER.
USE 2 TREBLE HOOKS N16 FOR EVERY HOOKLINE.
GREAT SUCCESS WITH THIS METHOD IN GREECE.

BEST REGARDS
COSTAS
 Aug 8, 2004; 05:23AM - Stowage of StrikeBack Fishing Lure Retrievers
 Category:  [other]
 Author Name:  John Szymanski
 Author E-mail:  john@strikebacktackle.com.au
Tip&Trick Description 1: Simple Stowage of StrikeBack Fishing Lure Retriever for more deck Space.
Most pole type lure retrievers are thick, bulky and rigid. StrikeBack is made of 1.5 metre fibreglass rods able to be connected together, each 8 or 10 mm in diameter, depending on the version.
Once you have your StrikeBack Fishing Lure Retriever at the boat; loctite the first two sections and slide the retriever in the gunwale rail on many aluminium boats, or attach a length of conduit along the inside of the boat. Your StrikeBack Fishing Lure Retriever is now stowed neatly as it has flexiblity to fit the contour of your the hull. Deck space is valuable, keep it clear.
 May 1, 2004; 02:24AM - In-Depth Spinnerbaiting
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Steven Narup
 Author E-mail:  sdnbasspro@aol.com
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 1: When most people are asked, “what is a spinnerbait?” They will more then likely reply with this, “it has a hook with a wire attached to it, with a lead head and a silicone skirt, with either one or two blades.” The majority of the time they will automatically describe the clothes pin spinnerbait. Well in essence, there is much more to that. There is more then just that style of spinnerbait, this is what most people do not understand. Two other spinnerbait types are just as productive when presented in the right situation. These two baits are the tail-spinner and the in-line spinner. These baits are slowly catching on to the clothespin spinnerbait.

There are quite a few styles of spinnerbaits, including tail spinners, in-line spinners, and clothespin style spinnerbaits. Each style has there own time and place. The most widely used of these spinnerbait choices, is the clothes pin style.

Tail spinners can be a great choice when fishing for smallmouth bass and or finicky largemouth due to the bait’s compact size.

In-line Spinners became obsolete for many years by most bass anglers. Until now, they are slowly catching on to both Smallmouth and Largemouth anglers.

In-line spinners are a great bait when the fish are active but they can also be great when presented it other situations. Most people use in-line spinners when the fish are in a negative feeding mood, due to the bait’s smaller more compact size. There is one problem with in-line spinners, which keep the majority of people away from them, the fact that they will give you line twist. To help with this scenario try a high quality stainless steel ball bearing, this will cut back on the line twist. A ball bearing helps prevent line twist like so, when the bait starts to spin and twist in the water column the line will most likely twist without a ball bearing. However, if you have a ball bearing connecting the mainline to the leader, when the bait twists the ball bearing spins the line back so that the line will not twist as easily. If by any chance you do have line twist, let out a couple hundred feet of line into the water and turn your trolling motor on, this will get most of the twist out of your line. Another trick is the tie your line to a heavy object and stretch the line out by tightening your drag and pulling the line.


The clothespin style spinnerbait comes in many different combinations including blade size and style and different size heads. There are Steel and Titanium wires. The Titanium version is nearly indestructible, and needs little or no tuning at all. Titanium also lets off quite a bit more vibration then steel. The heads on clothespin spinnerbaits are starting to be produced with different materials as well, such as Lead, and Tungsten. Spinnerbait anglers are slowly starting to make the switch to Tungsten spinnerbaits, due to the fact the head is almost 3/4 the size of lead, making the bait work through cover almost effortlessly.


In general, spinnerbaits are a very versatile lure, which is one main reason why most bass anglers use them. Bass anglers have been using them for many years now and they still produce fish as if they came out yesterday, you just have to know the different ways to fish the bait.

Tail spinners can be great finesse baits and they can be fished shallow or deep, because the body of the bait is lead, with a little blade on the back. The majority of tail spinners come with a single treble hook, making them not as easy as the clothespin style spinnerbait when trying to fish through thick cover. To work the tail-spinner you can just reel the bait back to the boat, by doing this you will reduce the odds of catching more fish, but it does work. Instead, you should give the bait a little action. You can yo-yo the bait by letting the bait fall to the bottom, then pick your rod tip up to about a 10 o’clock position, just keep repeating this procedure unless you are not producing. On the other hand, you can do a combination of things, to give the fish something different to look at. You can yo-yo the bait during part of the cast, then reel, or twitch it back to the boat. One last way to fish this bait would be to vertical jig it, in deep, clear, cold water. This technique will work in different conditions, but works best in deep, clear, cold water. When you vertical jig a tail spinner you cast the bait out a few feet and let the bait fall vertically, on a semi-slack line then you slowly lift your rod tip and shake the bait, let the bait fall and keep repeating this process. I like to use baitcasting gear when fishing tail spinners, but there are times when you need to fish lighter baits and that is when spinning gear comes into play. I mainly fish Pflueger rods and reels. The rods are very nice they come with premium Fuji guides and a Fuji reel seat, making the rod one nice package. I really like the Trion Baitcasting reel because they come with five ball bearings, one roller bearing and a smooth multi-disc main gear applied star drag system, making this a great reel for mostly any type of fishing. The reel is great if you want to fish a lighter line, because you can set your drag and the drag is so smooth that when a fish pulls there will not be as much stress on the line itself.


In-line spinners have been around for over fifty years, and they are still going strong, Mepps has been in the in-line spinner business for a while now, and they still sell great. Most anglers do not use in-line spinners while fishing for bass instead they are using bigger in-line spinners fishing for pike or musky. However, I know they are missing a lure that can catch bass like it can pike and musky. I have had great success fishing in-line spinners in creek openings, where the creek empties into the main river, fishing for smallmouth bass. In-line spinners can be worked shallow or deep, they come with or without tails, painted blades or non-painted blades. When you work an in-line spinner, the best possible way to fish these is to reel them in. If you try to jerk the bait, you will lose a lot of action, because in-line spinners are not made for jerking. In-line spinners let off a lot of flash, and maximum flash happens when you just reel it in. When I fish in-line spinners I like to use spinning gear preferably the Pflueger Trion spinning rod in a 6 ½ foot medium action, with a Pflueger Trion spinning reel, because they come in a 6:3:1 gear ratio which will allow you to speed up the bait without getting as tired out. They are very smooth and cast light baits a mile.

Clothespin spinnerbaits are one of your more versatile baits in the spinnerbait family. You can work them quite a few different ways, and give the bait action if you desire. When I work a safety pin spinnerbait, I really like to use a Pflueger Trion Baitcasting rod, anywhere from 6-foot medium to a 7-foot medium heavy action. The 6-foot rod will help you when you want to make accurate casts, and the 7-foot rod will help when you want to get distance with your bait. With the Trion rods, they are extra sensitive high modulus graphite, which will give you the ability to feel the blades turn on your bait. I will throw the bait on 15-20 pound test Berkley Trilene XL. When you work a safety pin spinnerbait, you can just reel it in, but again you are going to be missing some fish. When I fish a safety pin style spinnerbait, I sometimes jerk the bait, doing this gives the bait sort of an injured baitfish presentation. You can also let the bait flutter down, then you pick up your rod tip, and repeat, doing this gives the bait a yo-yo type effect. If I am going to be fishing a spinnerbait in cold water, I will look for anything that lets off heat because this will warm up the water just a little bit, fish do feel the difference, and I will fish the bait around that. If the fish are just coming up and nipping at the bait, you may want to add a trailer hook for extra insurance. I will usually throw a spinnerbait with a trailer hook in any tournament situation. If the fish are coming up and hitting that bait and not taking it you can use a soft plastic trailer, I prefer the three-inch Bear Claw Grub from Bearpaws Custom Handpoured Baits. I like the Bearpaws grub because it comes with the scent baked right in to the bait, this will give you a definite edge on other anglers, because you will not need to use scent on the exterior of the bait.

Spinnerbaits are a great and versatile lure that have made a lot of many for companies in the fishing industry. The only thing I can that I can leave you with say is next time you go out on the water, I dare you to tie on a spinnerbait, and I know that you will not regret it.

To contact Bearpaws Custom Handpoured Baits please contact John Olsen at http://www.bearpawshandpouredbaits.com. If you are interested in any of the reels that Pflueger has to offer please go to http://www.pfluegerfishing.com

 Mar 23, 2004; 01:15PM - In depth spinnerbaiting
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steven Narup
 Author E-mail:  Steven_Narup@hotmail.com
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 1: The equipment that Steven Narup
prefers to use is a Pflueger Trion.
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 2: Gambler Pro Series Spinnerbait

In-depth Spinnerbaiting

By: Steven Narup



When most people are asked, “what is a spinnerbait?” They will more then likely reply with this, “it has a hook with a wire attached to it, with a lead head and a silicone skirt, with either one or two blades.” The majority of the time they will automatically describe the clothes pin spinnerbait. Well in essence, there is much more to that. There is more then just that style of spinnerbait, this is what most people do not understand. Two other spinnerbait types are just as productive when presented in the right situation. These two baits are the tail-spinner and the in-line spinner. These baits are slowly catching on to the clothespin spinnerbait.



There are quite a few styles of spinnerbaits, including tail spinners, in-line spinners, and clothespin style spinnerbaits. Each style has there own time and place. The most widely used of these spinnerbait choices, is the clothes pin style.



Tail spinners can be a great choice when fishing for smallmouth bass and or finicky largemouth due to the bait’s compact size.



In-line Spinners became obsolete for many years by most bass anglers. Until now, they are slowly catching on to both Smallmouth and Largemouth anglers.



In-line spinners are a great bait when the fish are active but they can also be great when presented it other situations. Most people use in-line spinners when the fish are in a negative feeding mood, due to the bait’s smaller more compact size. There is one problem with in-line spinners, which keep the majority of people away from them, the fact that they will give you line twist. To help with this scenario try a high quality stainless steel ball bearing, this will cut back on the line twist. A ball bearing helps prevent line twist like so, when the bait starts to spin and twist in the water column the line will most likely twist without a ball bearing. However, if you have a ball bearing connecting the leader to the main line, when the bait twists the ball bearing spins the line back so that the line will not twist. If by any chance you do have line twist, let out a couple hundred feet of line into the water and turn your trolling motor on, this will get most of the twist out of your line. Another trick is the tie your line to a heavy object and stretch the line out by tightening your drag and pulling the line.





The clothespin style spinnerbait comes in many different combinations including blade size and style and different size heads. There are Steel and Titanium wires. The Titanium version is nearly indestructible, and needs little or no tuning at all. Titanium also lets off quite a bit more vibration then steel. The heads on clothespin spinnerbaits are starting to be produced with different materials as well, such as Lead, and Tungsten. Spinnerbait anglers are slowly starting to make the switch to Tungsten spinnerbaits, due to the fact the head is almost ¾ the size of lead, making the bait work through cover almost effortlessly.





. In general, spinnerbaits are a very versatile lure, which is one main reason why most bass anglers use them. Bass anglers have been using them for many years now and they still produce fish as if they came out yesterday, you just have to know the different ways to fish the bait.



Tail spinners can be great finesse baits and they can be fished shallow or deep, because the body of the bait is lead, with a little blade on the back. The majority of tail spinners come with a single treble hook, making them not as easy as the clothespin style spinnerbait when trying to fish through thick cover. To work the tail-spinner you can just reel the bait back to the boat, but doing this you will reduce the odds of catching more fish, but it does work. Instead, you should give the bait a little action. You can yo-yo the bait by letting the bait fall to the bottom, then pick your rod tip up to about a 10 o’clock position, just keep repeating this procedure unless you are not producing. On the other hand, you can do a combination of things, to give the fish something different to look at. You can yo-yo the bait during part of the cast, then reel, or twitch it back to the boat. One last way to fish this bait would be to vertical jig it, in deep, clear, cold water. This technique will work in different conditions, but works best in deep, clear, cold water. When you vertical jig a tail spinner you cast the bait out a few feet and let the bait fall vertically, on a semi-slack line then you slowly lift your rod tip and shake the bait, let the bait fall and keep repeating this process. I like to use baitcasting gear when fishing tail spinners, but there are times when you need to fish lighter baits and that is when spinning gear comes into play. I mainly fish Pflueger rods and reels. The rods are very nice they come with premium Fuji guides and a Fuji reel seat, making the rod one nice package. I really like the Trion Baitcasting reel because they come with five ball bearings, one roller bearing and a smooth multi-disc main gear applied star drag system, making this a great reel for mostly any type of fishing. The reel is great if you want to fish a lighter line, because you can set your drag and the drag is so smooth that when a fish pools there will not be as much stress on the line itself.





In-line spinners have been around for over fifty years, and they are still going strong, Mepps has been in the in-line spinner business for a while now, and they still sell great. Most anglers do not use in-line spinners while fishing for bass instead they are using bigger in-line spinners fishing for pike or musky. However, I know they are missing a lure that can catch bass like it can pike and musky. I have had great success fishing in-line spinners in creek openings, where the creek empties into the main river, fishing for smallmouth bass. In-line spinners can be worked shallow or deep, they come with or without tails, painted blades or non-painted blades. When you work an in-line spinner, the best possible way to fish these is to reel them in. If you try to jerk the bait, you will lose a lot of action, because in-line spinners are not made for jerking. In-line spinners let off a lot of flash, and maximum flash happens when you just reel it in. When I fish in-line spinners I like to use spinning gear preferably the Pflueger Trion spinning rod in a 6 ½ foot medium action, with a Pflueger Trion spinning reel, because they come in a 6:3:1 gear ratio which will allow you to speed up the bait without getting as tired out. They are very smooth and cast light baits a mile.



Clothespin spinnerbaits are one of your more versatile bait in the spinnerbait family. You can work them quite a few different ways, and give the bait a great action if you desire. When I work a safety pin spinnerbait, I really like to use a Pflueger Trion Baitcasting rod, anywhere from 6-foot medium to a 7-foot medium heavy action. The 6-foot rod will help you when you want to make accurate casts, and the 7-foot rod will help when you want to get distance with your bait. With the Trion rods, they are extra sensitive high modulus graphite, which will give you the ability to feel the blades turn on your bait. I will throw the bait on 15-20 pound test Berkley Trilene XL. When you work a safety pin spinnerbait, you can just reel it in, but again you are going to be missing some fish. When I fish a safety pin style spinnerbait, I sometimes jerk the bait, doing this gives the bait sort of an injured baitfish presentation. You can also let the bait flutter down, then you pick up your rod tip, and repeat, doing this gives the bait a yo-yo type effect. If I am going to be fishing a spinnerbait in cold water, I will look for anything that lets off heat because this will warm up the water just a little bit, fish do feel the difference, and I will fish the bait around that. If the fish are just coming up and nipping at the bait, you may want to add a trailer hook for extra insurance. I will usually throw a spinnerbait with a trailer hook in any tournament situation. If the fish are coming up and hitting that bait and not taking it you can use a soft plastic trailer, I like to use the Gambler Pro Series Spinnerbaits, beacause they come with high quailty blades and ball bearings, making it almost effortless to slow roll them and let them flutter down. To dress the Gambler Pro Series spinnerbait up I prefer the three-inch Bear Claw Grub from Bearpaws Custom Handpoured Baits. I like the Bearpaws grub because it comes with the scent baked right in to the bait, this will give you a definite edge on other anglers, because you will not need to use scent on the exterior of the bait.



Spinnerbaits are a great and versatile lure that have made a lot of many for companies in the fishing industry. The only thing I can say is next time you go out on the water I dare you to tie on a spinnerbait, and I know that you will not regret it.
 Jan 5, 2004; 10:17PM - Spanish Mackerel Tricks
 Category:  Fishing tips and tricks
 Author Name:  Tony
 Author E-mail:  www.Fishingking01@aol.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: I love fishing for Spanish mackerel, so I do it often. When I shove off to go fishing, I often stumble upon a very large school of mackerel, but sometimes they all don't want to feed and reject anything you throw at them. When this happenes, a good trick to get them to bite is to get them exited so they just want to catch what the think is a little fish just for the fun of it. To do this you would want to swich immediately to anywhere from a 1/4oz to a 1/2oz kastmaser-(like a spoon but a lot better). I make a long cast to where the fish are and as soon as that lure hits the water I begin to reel in just fast enough to get the kastmaser poping out of the water kinda like a fleeing baitfish. After it jumps out of the water a couple times keep it fast just below the surface. Do this at least 4 times during your retrieve and pretty soon you will have dozens of mackerel chasing your lure just for the sport of it until the lure bites back and then you get to have all the fun.
Tip&Trick Description 2: When you get those swarms of mackerel chasing the your line, sometimes your lure will come to the boat a little early and the fish will ignore the katmaster and just swim away. To prevent this you want to go to the opposite end of the boat, make your cast, and then maneuver the lure so it will swim parallel to the boat, instead of directly at it, taking the mackerel with it. You will be catching mackerel right at the side of the boat.
Tip&Trick Description 3: These techniques have worked for me many times and gotten me coolers full of fish and I hope they work for you, too. Good fishing till next time.
 Jan 4, 2004; 08:18PM - Power Drop -Shot Tactic
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steve S&K Guide Service
 Author E-mail:  svonbrandt@msn.com
Tip&Trick Description 1: We have been using a Power Drop Shot technique that you may have heard of, and it works great in Heavy Cover, and around docks and wood in rivers and lakes. We just rig a heavy weight of 3/8 to 3/4 of an ounce, and then tie on the bait, such as a Yamamoto 'IKA' tube about 10 inches up the line on a 3/0 Gamakatsu hook, and flip and pitch it right in the same way as a jig or other bait. It stays there longer and has more action. Deadly on in-active fish. To view more tips and tactics and chat with other bass anglers from all over North America, stop by and visit us at our Proboards! http://skguides.proboards20.com
 Aug 27, 2003; 04:52PM - 'Crankbait Tactics For Huge Prespawn Bass' by Steve vonBrandt
 Category:  Freshwater Bass Fishing Tips
 Author Name:  Steve vonBrandt/S&K Guide Service
 Author E-mail:  swvbbass@aol.com
Click here to enlarge Tip&Trick Description 1: Crankbait Tactics for Huge Prespawn Bass
By Steve VonBrandt
One of the most effective ways to catch huge prespawn bass in lakes and rivers are Lipless crankbaits. These baits are especially effective when the water temperature is between 49 and 58 degrees, especially in stained or muddy water in lakes and ponds, but it also works in the rivers also. Some of the techniques outlined below will help you catch bigger bass all over the country in the early spring starting in march, and peaking in April.

'TYPES OF BAITS

There are are variety of lipless crankbaits on the market that catch bass, but in the spring, in most lakes and ponds, in the Northeast, the Rat-L-Trap by bill Lewis Lures, the Rattlin' Rapala, and the Viva Vibe, are some of the best. All lipless crankbaits have a different sound. Some are much louder than others, and will produce when some other quieter baits won't. At other times, the quitter rattling baits will produce more. You just have to experiment with several baits until you find the ones that are producing best in the particular body of water you're fishing in. Sometimes the same baits, in the same size, by the same company, make slightly different sounds, that can be better than the other, Experimentation is the only way to find which bait works the best. Some baits won't run as true at different speeds, and they turn sideways a little more than others, so you just have to watch them in the water, and find the best ones. The hooks should always be changed to a premium hook system such as Gamakatsu or Owner or Eagle Claw Premium. There are many other great hooks, but I prefer these. Most of your lipless crankbaits should be used in a 1/4 to 1/2 ounce size, but recently, bigger bass in the Northeast and in Florida have hit the bigger Slat Water Traps in the 3/4 to 1 ounce sizes.

COLORS OF BAITS

The best colors for the spring, especially if you have a lot of Crawfish in the lake, are red, red/orange, and brownish/orange. Some have spots on them and these are very effective. The standard Chrome, and Chrome with a blue back, and Chrome and Red, have worked especially well for the larger bass. If the water is extremely stained to muddy, we forund that the red, and the chartruese/brown combinations work well in this kind of situation also. If you have a lot of bluegill in the area, and less crawfish or shad, then the blugill/Suncracker patterns work very well. The primary forage in the lakes are the best patterns, unless you know that many anglers are aware of this, and are using these colors also. Then switching to unconventional patterns can fool some of the wary bigger bass.

'TECHNIQUES

Most people just cast the baits out and reel them straight in. While this will always catch some bass, there are more specialized methods that trigger strikes from the bigger bass. Cast the Rat-L-Traps out, and depending on the depth of the water, count them down to the level of the fish before starting the retrieve, and if it is a sandy and/or gravel/rocky type of bottom, let them sink to the bottom, then slowly raise the tip of the rod till you feel the lure vibrating, reeling the slack up a little slowly, then lower the rod tip, and do it again. Many times they will hit as it is on the bottom, and first starts to be lifted up. If these techniques don't work in a few hours, use a slight pumping action of the rod as you reel, keeping contact with the bait. If it hits a rock, weeds, or other structure, hesitate a second, and then rip it off quickly, and reel it in with a steady retrieve. You can also yo-yo the bait similar to a spoon or spinnerbait in deeper water near points and drop-offs, which can be extremely effective in colder water or on inactive fish that are suspended. Most of the time in water below 58 degrees they hit very mushy, like grass or leaves, or even like a stick is on it, but most of the time it is a bass. As they get close to the boat they will see you and make a dash for the trolling motor, and down to deeper water, sometimes even breaking the surface to throw the lure. They bass have to played very carefully as lipless crankbaits come out of the bass's mouth much more easily than you might imagine. Most of the bass will be in the shallower water off the flats, near deeper water, rip-raps, if available, or any place where there is baitfish and or cover near the North shore or bay, close to food sources, near where they are going to spawn.

EQUIPMENT

I like to use sinning gear for the smaller 1/4 ounce baits, and I use baitcast gear for the larger 3/4 to 1 1/2 ounce baits. I usually use a 7 foot spinning rod in med action so as not to pull the bait from their mouths, usually a S- Glass rod, or a G.Loomis Cranking Rod. In the baitcasters, I use a 7 foot, med to Med/Heavy rod, with a high speed reel, but many people prefer a good reel in a 5:0:1 or 5:3:1 gear ration. I always use Spiderline super mono in 10-12 pound test, but 8 pound test is preferred by many. Stren is a also a good line for this. Fan cast the baits in as many directions as possible in the prime areas such as the mouths of the back bays with creeks, where grasses and riprap, are on a harder bottom, and you will start picking up some of these monsters this spring. A good scent on the baits, such a Yum in Crawfish scent, can't hurt either.

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